gilana: (half)
I need to make a few dairy-based meals I can prepare ahead of time and eat cold on Sunday and Monday during the holiday of Shavuot.  Anyone have any good recipes?  None of my usual ones are sounding too appealing right now.  Might do a pasta salad of some sort, I suppose, and maybe a gazpacho if I find a good recipe, but I'd love more ideas!  (Fish is ok, but no meat, please -- dairy is traditional for this holiday.)
gilana: (Default)
Aaron and I were both working near South Station today, so we met up at the farmer's market in Dewey Square on our way home.  We picked up some fresh corn, a spinach and onion ciabatta from When Pigs Fly, and a pint of heirloom cherry tomatoes.  We stopped at the market on the way home for some goat cheese.  When we got home, I roasted the tomatoes and a head of garlic.  We toasted slices of the bread and ate them smeared with roasted garlic, creamy goat cheese, and sweet carmelized tomatoes, along with fresh corn dripping with butter.  Oh my god so good!

Holy yum

Jul. 1st, 2011 06:38 pm
gilana: (Default)
Just made this for an early shabbos dinner before I go over to Harvard Square to see the amazing set my boyfriend built (and, of course, the show that will be performed on it.)  I don't know why it's called barbecued beef, it's not barbecued at all, but it is an amazingly tasty vaguely Cambodian flavor explosion, and a nice way to satisfy your meat cravings even when it's hot out.  Do read my notes before you start, some of the amounts are a little wonky.

Barbequed Beef Salad

3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons lime juice
2 teaspoons brown sugar
2 large garlic cloves -- minced

1 pound Sirloin or top round steak
2 tablespoons Vegetable oil
2 butter lettuce heads
3 tablespoons fresh mint -- chopped
3 tablespoons fresh cilantro -- chopped
Green onions
2 tablespoons unsalted peanuts -- chopped

Mix soy, lime juice, sugar, and garlic until sugar dissolves. Reserve 1/4 cup of the mixture. (This recipe actually only made about 1/4 cup to begin with -- I went back and made another double batch to marinate in.) Marinate the steak in the sauce mixture for about 30 minutes.

Broil steak to desired doneness, cut across the grain into thin strips.   (It doesn't say to let it rest after broiling, but of course we know to do that.)

Wash and drain the lettuce, cilantro, and mint. Tear the lettuce into bite-sized pieces and toss in a large bowl with the mint and cilantro.

Mix the reserved 1/4 cup sauce mix with the oil, shake or whisk to combine.

Pour over the lettuce and toss to coat. Turn out onto a serving plate and arrange the beef slices on top. Garnish with green onion tops and sprinkle with peanuts.

Serve immediately

recipe

Apr. 1st, 2011 09:58 am
gilana: (Default)
I made this yesterday on asparagus, but it was so good we were dipping everything into it and practically licking the plates.  It would be fabulous as a marinade for fish, and I'm thinking of using some as salad dressing on baby spinach for dinner tonight, if I can bring myself to leave the house to get the spinach.

Lime-Soy Vinaigrette

2 tablespoons lime juice (from about 1 lime)
1/8 teaspoon cayenne (or less if you're me)
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
5 tablespoons cooking oil
1/4 teaspoon salt

Whisk together the lime juice, cayenne, soy sauce, and salt. Add the oil slowly, whisking.

recipe

Apr. 1st, 2011 09:58 am
gilana: (Default)
I made this yesterday on asparagus, but it was so good we were dipping everything into it and practically licking the plates.  It would be fabulous as a marinade for fish, and I'm thinking of using some as salad dressing on baby spinach for dinner tonight, if I can bring myself to leave the house to get the spinach.

Lime-Soy Vinaigrette

2 tablespoons lime juice (from about 1 lime)
1/8 teaspoon cayenne (or less if you're me)
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
5 tablespoons cooking oil
1/4 teaspoon salt

Whisk together the lime juice, cayenne, soy sauce, and salt. Add the oil slowly, whisking.

recipes

Nov. 7th, 2010 03:04 pm
gilana: (Default)
I made this Mediterranean Eggplant and Barley salad from Smitten Kitchen for a pot-luck on Saturday, and it was delicious. I don't like zucchini, so I left that out, and I roasted the halved cherry tomatoes along with the eggplant, because I love roasted tomatoes. It takes some time and some dishwashing, but it's not actually very difficult, and like I say, tasty! I might have to make another batch for myself soon.

recipes

Nov. 7th, 2010 03:04 pm
gilana: (Default)
I made this Mediterranean Eggplant and Barley salad from Smitten Kitchen for a pot-luck on Saturday, and it was delicious. I don't like zucchini, so I left that out, and I roasted the halved cherry tomatoes along with the eggplant, because I love roasted tomatoes. It takes some time and some dishwashing, but it's not actually very difficult, and like I say, tasty! I might have to make another batch for myself soon.
gilana: (Default)
Got to go on a tour of the Central Square farmer's market with Chef Chris Schlesinger of the East Coast Grill, thanks to the Mass Farmer's Market Facebook page.  I've never actually eaten at East Coast, but I'm thinking I might try their brunch some time now.

I ended up buying more than I normally do at a farmer's market, and more adventurously as well. My haul:
  • Hen of the woods mushrooms
  • Calabash squash
  • Yellow carrots (very sweet!)
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Garlic
  • Cortland apple (for baking with bleu cheese)
  • Honeycrisp apple (for nomming)
They're trying to get Tony Maws, from Craigie St, to do a tour before market season ends -- man, would I love to be along for that one!
gilana: (Default)
Got to go on a tour of the Central Square farmer's market with Chef Chris Schlesinger of the East Coast Grill, thanks to the Mass Farmer's Market Facebook page.  I've never actually eaten at East Coast, but I'm thinking I might try their brunch some time now.

I ended up buying more than I normally do at a farmer's market, and more adventurously as well. My haul:
  • Hen of the woods mushrooms
  • Calabash squash
  • Yellow carrots (very sweet!)
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Garlic
  • Cortland apple (for baking with bleu cheese)
  • Honeycrisp apple (for nomming)
They're trying to get Tony Maws, from Craigie St, to do a tour before market season ends -- man, would I love to be along for that one!
gilana: (Default)
I discovered garlic scapes for the first time last year at a famer's market. Luckily, I also found a really easy and delicious recipe for them. While mine are simmering on the stove, I thought I'd share, in case anyone else is trying to figure out what the heck you do with them.

garlic scapes
1 t olive oil
soy sauce
2 T rice wine vinegar
sesame oil

Cut the scapes into 2 inch sections, trimming off any dried ends
Heat about 1 tsp olive oil in a skillet until almost smoking. [Yes, I know that's a useless instruction. Sorry. If that means nothing to you, just make it hot and don't burn the oil.]
Add the scapes to the pan and stir them around for a minute or so, then add a few dashes of soy sauce (basically to taste, however salty you'd want) and about 2 T rice wine vinegar.
Turn the heat to med-low, let this cook down until it starts to look caramelized.
Add water if you need it to prevent burning (as I use very little oil, I tend to use more water, which yeah, steams things, but oh well. In this case, it's good becase scapes can be chewy and this makes them softer while still retaining a bit of toothsomeness.)
When they approach a soft but still slightly chewy consistency (taste a few to see where they are), take them off the stove and mix in a dash or two of sesame oil and serve.
[The sauce is really tasty, it might be worth making up some brown rice or something to have them over.]
gilana: (Default)
I discovered garlic scapes for the first time last year at a famer's market. Luckily, I also found a really easy and delicious recipe for them. While mine are simmering on the stove, I thought I'd share, in case anyone else is trying to figure out what the heck you do with them.

garlic scapes
1 t olive oil
soy sauce
2 T rice wine vinegar
sesame oil

Cut the scapes into 2 inch sections, trimming off any dried ends
Heat about 1 tsp olive oil in a skillet until almost smoking. [Yes, I know that's a useless instruction. Sorry. If that means nothing to you, just make it hot and don't burn the oil.]
Add the scapes to the pan and stir them around for a minute or so, then add a few dashes of soy sauce (basically to taste, however salty you'd want) and about 2 T rice wine vinegar.
Turn the heat to med-low, let this cook down until it starts to look caramelized.
Add water if you need it to prevent burning (as I use very little oil, I tend to use more water, which yeah, steams things, but oh well. In this case, it's good becase scapes can be chewy and this makes them softer while still retaining a bit of toothsomeness.)
When they approach a soft but still slightly chewy consistency (taste a few to see where they are), take them off the stove and mix in a dash or two of sesame oil and serve.
[The sauce is really tasty, it might be worth making up some brown rice or something to have them over.]

local food

May. 28th, 2010 08:46 am
gilana: (Default)
I happened to be on Mass Ave around Porter yesterday, and stumbled across Capone Foods, a fresh pasta etc store, not unlike Dave's Fresh Pasta. They had some different options from Dave's, though, so I bought a container of the Plum Tomato with Porcini sauce to try.

I licked the pot after I was done. Not just the plate... the pot.

So, yeah, consider this a recommendation. They've got lots of pasta (including shaped pastas, as well as flat and ravioli) and sauces, a bunch of frozen entrées that sound good (I obviously can't try the duck and squash lasagna, but I hope someone does!), useful charts and signage that suggest good pasta/sauce pairing, and very friendly and helpful staff. In addition to the Mass Ave location, they have another store in Union Square, where the production is done, so the Mass Ave one only has pre-packaged amounts whereas Union Sq is more flexible.

local food

May. 28th, 2010 08:46 am
gilana: (Default)
I happened to be on Mass Ave around Porter yesterday, and stumbled across Capone Foods, a fresh pasta etc store, not unlike Dave's Fresh Pasta. They had some different options from Dave's, though, so I bought a container of the Plum Tomato with Porcini sauce to try.

I licked the pot after I was done. Not just the plate... the pot.

So, yeah, consider this a recommendation. They've got lots of pasta (including shaped pastas, as well as flat and ravioli) and sauces, a bunch of frozen entrées that sound good (I obviously can't try the duck and squash lasagna, but I hope someone does!), useful charts and signage that suggest good pasta/sauce pairing, and very friendly and helpful staff. In addition to the Mass Ave location, they have another store in Union Square, where the production is done, so the Mass Ave one only has pre-packaged amounts whereas Union Sq is more flexible.
gilana: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] desireearmfeldt is out of town, so she let me have her farm share this week. [livejournal.com profile] surrealestate kindly picked it up with her own and let me take just the stuff I thought I'd actually use. So far, last night I used the green beans to make Stir-Fried Sichuan Green Beans, and right now I'm using the eggplant, some of the tomatoes, and some of the cilantro in a Grilled Eggplant Salad with Cilantro-Chile Dressing. I believe this is the first time I've ever actually cooked eggplant. I've still got two lovely tomatoes and a bunch of potatoes to use; I'm thinking I might try this Salsa Verde for Potatoes.

The recipes, in case you're interested )
gilana: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] desireearmfeldt is out of town, so she let me have her farm share this week. [livejournal.com profile] surrealestate kindly picked it up with her own and let me take just the stuff I thought I'd actually use. So far, last night I used the green beans to make Stir-Fried Sichuan Green Beans, and right now I'm using the eggplant, some of the tomatoes, and some of the cilantro in a Grilled Eggplant Salad with Cilantro-Chile Dressing. I believe this is the first time I've ever actually cooked eggplant. I've still got two lovely tomatoes and a bunch of potatoes to use; I'm thinking I might try this Salsa Verde for Potatoes.

The recipes, in case you're interested )

recipe

Jul. 4th, 2009 09:43 pm
gilana: (Default)
I got this recipe from Epicurious and daringly made it for a party today without trying it first. Luckily, it was absolutely delicious, and so I share it with you, my friends.

Cucumber and Watermelon Salad with Hoisin-Lime Dressing
Bon Appétit | July 2002

A Vietnamese-style salad that makes a refreshing accompaniment to any kind of barbecued meat.
Yield: Makes 6 servings

1 1/2 large English hothouse cucumbers, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 3 cups)
(I used regular cucumbers and it turned out just fine.)
3 cups 1/2-inch cubes seeded watermelon

3 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
1/3 cup coarsely chopped lightly salted dry-roasted peanuts

Combine cucumbers and watermelon in medium bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 15 minutes and up to 4 hours. Drain; discard liquid.

Whisk lime juice and hoisin sauce in small bowl to blend. Pour dressing over cucumber-watermelon mixture and toss gently. Season salad to taste with pepper. Sprinkle salad with cilantro, mint, and then peanuts. Serve immediately.

recipe

Jul. 4th, 2009 09:43 pm
gilana: (Default)
I got this recipe from Epicurious and daringly made it for a party today without trying it first. Luckily, it was absolutely delicious, and so I share it with you, my friends.

Cucumber and Watermelon Salad with Hoisin-Lime Dressing
Bon Appétit | July 2002

A Vietnamese-style salad that makes a refreshing accompaniment to any kind of barbecued meat.
Yield: Makes 6 servings

1 1/2 large English hothouse cucumbers, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 3 cups)
(I used regular cucumbers and it turned out just fine.)
3 cups 1/2-inch cubes seeded watermelon

3 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
1/3 cup coarsely chopped lightly salted dry-roasted peanuts

Combine cucumbers and watermelon in medium bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 15 minutes and up to 4 hours. Drain; discard liquid.

Whisk lime juice and hoisin sauce in small bowl to blend. Pour dressing over cucumber-watermelon mixture and toss gently. Season salad to taste with pepper. Sprinkle salad with cilantro, mint, and then peanuts. Serve immediately.

Dinner

Jun. 24th, 2009 08:35 pm
gilana: (Default)
Cedar-planked chicken thighs with soy-ginger glaze, sautéed garlic scapes, and port wine macerated strawberries (scapes and strawberries fresh from the Davis Sq farmer's market this afternoon.) Damn, I hope this all tastes half as good as it sounds!

Dinner

Jun. 24th, 2009 08:35 pm
gilana: (Default)
Cedar-planked chicken thighs with soy-ginger glaze, sautéed garlic scapes, and port wine macerated strawberries (scapes and strawberries fresh from the Davis Sq farmer's market this afternoon.) Damn, I hope this all tastes half as good as it sounds!
gilana: (Default)
Brought this to [livejournal.com profile] 42itous's picnic, and it was popular (and tasty!) enough that I figured I'd post the recipe here. Quick and easy, I'd totally make it again. I didn't have fresh tarragon on hand, but fresh basil worked fine.

Asparagus, Goat Cheese and Lemon Pasta
Adapted from Bon Appetit

As it turns out, goat cheese makes a really great quick, creamy pasta sauce. And whether you blanche your pasta with asparagus or you swap in fava beans or string beans or seriously, you name it, this comes together so quickly that I forgave it for not winning any beauty contests.

Serves 6

1 pound spiral-shaped pasta
1 pound slender asparagus spears, trimmed, cut into 1- to 1 1/2-inch pieces
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon peel
2 teaspoons chopped fresh tarragon plus more for garnish
1 5- to 5 1/2-ounce log soft fresh goat cheese (the pre-crumbled stuff will not melt as well)
Fresh lemon juice to taste (optional)

Cook your pasta in a large pot of well-salted water until it is almost tender, or about three minutes shy of what the package suggests. Add asparagus and cook until firm-tender, another two to three minutes. Drain both pasta and asparagus together, reserving one cup of pasta water.

Meanwhile, combine olive oil, lemon peel, tarragon and cheese in a large bowl, breaking up the goat cheese as you put it in. Add hot pasta and asparagus to bowl, along with a couple splashes of the pasta water. Toss until smoothly combined, adding more pasta water if needed. Season generously with salt and pepper, and lemon juice if you feel it needs a little extra kick. (We did.)

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